Category: This Day in History

Telescope fixed inside contact lens

Telescope fixed inside contact lens

Swiss scientists have developed groundbreaking new contact lenses with a built-in telescope that could help many patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration (AMD) regain full sight. The 1.55-milimeter thick lens, developed by researchers at Lausanne-based École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), contains an extremely thin, reflective telescope. The pair of contact lenses work in conjunction [&hellip

Biotech apples approved in US

Biotech apples approved in US

For the first time US regulators have approved commercialized biotech apples amid attempts by the organic industry and other institutes to block the genetically modified fruit. The two apple varieties modified to resist browning are developed by the Canadian company Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc., and were approved by the US Department of Agriculture’s Animal and [&hellip

1000s mourn US victims of ‘hate-crime’

1000s mourn US victims of ‘hate-crime’

Thousands of people in the United States have attended the funeral of three Muslim students shot dead by a middle-aged white man in North Carolina, demanding the deadly incident be investigated as a “hate crime”. More than 5,500 people gathered on Thursday afternoon on a soccer field for the funeral of Deah Shaddy Barakat, 23, [&hellip

Discovery of largest genetic fat map

Discovery of largest genetic fat map

Scientists have uncovered more than 90 new gene regions that could help explain why some people are more likely to put on weight than others. The team scoured DNA libraries of more than 300,000 people, constructing the largest-ever genetic map of obesity. Looking for consistent patterns they found a link with genes involved in brain [&hellip

‘Smart’ insulin hope for diabetes

‘Smart’ insulin hope for diabetes

Scientists are hopeful that “smart” insulins which are undergoing trials could revolutionise the way diabetes is managed. Instead of repeated blood tests and injections throughout the day to keep blood sugar in check, a single dose of smart insulin would keep circulating in the body and turn on when needed. Animal studies show the technology [&hellip

Snake venom mystery undone

Snake venom mystery undone

Schizophrenia, epilepsy and chronic pain research receives a boost as the mystery behind the Costa Rican coral snake’s capability to induce seizures in its victims is deciphered by researchers. The mechanism in the snake’s venom is consisted of a pair of proteins called micrurotoxins (MmTX) which bind to the pores of the nerve cells located [&hellip

Nearly 29,000 dead in UK cold snap

Nearly 29,000 dead in UK cold snap

Official figures reveal that the death rate related to cold snaps in England and Wales is over 30% higher than normal for this time of year. According to the Office for National Statistics (ONS) some 28,800 people died in the fortnight ending January 23. ONS said the flu virus and the cold snap are the main [&hellip

Twitter earnings beat expectations

Twitter earnings beat expectations

Twitter reported a net loss of $125m (£82m) in the fourth-quarter, beating analyst expectations. It also said revenue grew faster than expected, increasing by 95% to $479m during the October to December period. Total monthly active users were 288 million, an increase of 20% from the year earlier. However, growth from last quarter was significantly [&hellip

Emoticons can rack up huge bills

Emoticons can rack up huge bills

People using the little icons that denote happy, sad or other emotions in their text messages could be racking up big bills. Consumer website MoneySavingExpert  has received a large number of complaints about the issue. It seems to affect older models of phones, including some Samsung and Apple handsets. In Scotland, a woman ran up bills [&hellip

Half cancer deaths ‘can be prevented’

Half cancer deaths ‘can be prevented’

Almost half of the 7.5 million people who die of cancer globally every year can be saved, says the president of the Union for International Cancer Control. Speaking at an event hosted by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna, Tezer Kutluk said 3-4 million deaths from cancer can be prevented annually if governments [&hellip